Apple Nachos

Autumn is upon us and it’s my FAVOURITE time of the year.
I LOVE LOVE LOVE apple picking with my family.
I was browsing the internet to find some delicious snack recipes for my clients, and I found this one that I thought maybe you all would enjoy.

It’s a healthy spin on Nachos.  It’s perfect as well if you’re following a Paleo lifestyle.
Check it out below!
I’m definitely going to try it out.  I found this on the Paleo Grubs website.

nachos

Ingredients

• Apples
• Fresh lemon juice
• Almond butter
• Chocolate chips
• Unsweetened shredded coconut
• Sliced almonds

Instructions

1. Slice apples and toss with the lemon juice in a large bowl
2. Arrange the apples in a plate and drizzle with almond butter. You can use a pastry/piping bag or a ziploc bag to drizzle the almond butter.
3. Sprinkle with shredded coconut, chocolate chips and sliced almonds

Enjoy!! I know I will!

Danielle

Sweet Heat Shrimp & Pineapple Skewers

Good morning!
While browsing the internet this morning for some new recipes I can try at home – I found this one that I know my husband will love, so I thought I’d share!

I found it from the Hungry Girl website.

Sweet Heat Shrimp & Pineapple Skewers

Hungry Girl's Sweet Heat Shrimp & Pineapple Skewers

Ingredients:
1/2 cup pineapple juice You don’t need added sugar
1 tbsp. Sriracha 
1 tsp. Chopped garlic
1 tsp. Chopped ginger
1 tsp. Honey
10 oz. (about 22) raw large shrimp, peeled, tails removed, deveined
1 cup fresh pineapple chunks 

Directions:
In a wide bowl, combine all ingredients except shrimp and pineapple. Mix until uniform.
Add shrimp, and stir to coat. Cover and refrigerate to marinate for 1 hour.
Meanwhile, if using wooden skewers, soak in water for 30 minutes to prevent burning.
Alternately thread shrimp and pineapple onto four skewers. Discard excess marinade.

Bring a grill sprayed with nonstick spray to medium-high heat. Grill kebabs for 3 minutes with the grill cover down.
Flip kebabs. With the grill cover down, grill for 3 minutes, or until shrimp are cooked through and pineapple has lightly browned.

MAKES 2 SERVINGS!

The nutrition value of the skewers will be skewed as I ditched the pineapple juice.  However, here’s a GUIDELINE. Obviously the sugar content will be a little lower.

1/2 of recipe (2 skewers): 206 calories, 1.5g fat, 563mg sodium, 19.5g carbs, 1g fiber, 13g sugars, 28g protein

Chicken Caesar Salad Pizza

Good morning readers!!  I found a new recipe I’m going to try! It sounds delicious!! Check it out! It’s from the Hungry Girl’s website!  I made some moderations to the recipe so the nutrition information will be a bit skewed, however when you prepare the pizza, you can easily track your calories.

Moderations:
-1oz real Shredded cheese instead of using a cheese string
-Regular dressing instead of calorie/light dressing
-Removed the “parm-style topping”

Ingredients:

1oz Shredded Cheese of your choice

1 high-fiber pita


2 oz. cooked and finely chopped skinless chicken breast

2 cups finely chopped romaine lettuce

2 tbsp. finely chopped red onion

1 tbsp. Caesar dressing

Directions:

 Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spray a baking sheet with nonstick spray.

Lay pita on the baking sheet, and sprinkle with shredded cheese and chicken. Bake until hot and lightly browned, 8 – 10 minutes.

Let pita cool, about 10 minutes. To make the salad, mix romaine and onion in a medium-large bowl. Toss with dressing.

Top pita with salad. Grab a fork and knife, and dig in!

Makes 1 serving

 
Entire recipe: 326 calories, 9g fat, 833mg sodium, 37g carbs, 8g fiber, 3.5g sugars, 30.5g protein

Read more: Chicken Caesar Salad Pizza http://caloriecount.about.com/chicken-caesar-salad-pizza-b630472#ixzz3AHgEkJmb

Baked Zucchini Boats

zucchini_boats2

Hosting a BBQ this weekend? Here is the perfect recipe to serve up! I am going to try it out for myself!  I found this recipe on “The Zucchini Diaries” website. ( http://thezucchinidiaries.blogspot.ca/ )


You’ll need:

4 large zucchinis, washed
About 1/4 cup of Parmesan cheese, grated extra fine
About 2 tbsp of breadcrumbs 
8 cherry tomatoes, halved
Fresh chopped basil
Olive oil
Salt & Pepper
 
 Cooking Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Make about a 1/2 inch slice vertically down the side of each zucchini, then using a melon baller, scoop out the insides of the zucchini until you’ve created about a 1/4 inch trough. 
  3. Brush the zucchini inside and out with a little olive oil, then place 4 cherry tomato halves inside each zucchini boat, sprinkle with cheese, top with the breadcrumbs, and add a pinch of salt and pepper.
  4. Bake for roughly 25 minutes, or until the zucchini is tender.
  5. Top with fresh chopped basil.

Apple Oatmeal Recipe

In this healthy oatmeal recipe, cook apples into your morning oatmeal and you’ll start the day right with whole grains and a serving of fruit.

Apple Oatmeal Recipe

Makes: 4 servings, about 1 1/4 cups each

Active Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 crisp apples, divided
  • 1 cup steel-cut oats
  • 4 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt

PREPARATION

  1. Shred 2 apples using the large holes of a box grater, leaving the core behind.
  2. Heat a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add oats and cook, stirring, until lightly toasted, about 2 minutes. Add water and the shredded apples; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to maintain a simmer and cook, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, chop the remaining 2 apples.
  4. After the oats have cooked for 10 minutes, stir in the chopped apples, 2 tablespoons brown sugar, cinnamon and salt; continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the apples are tender and the oatmeal is quite thick, 15 to 20 minutes more. Divide the oatmeal among 4 bowls. Top each portion with 2 tablespoons yogurt and 3/4 teaspoon brown sugar.

TIPS & NOTES

  • Shopping Tip: Choose unbruised, firm apples with smooth skin. Store for up to 4 months in the refrigerator.

NUTRITION

Per serving: 207 calories; 1 g fat (0 g sat, 1 g mono); 0 mg cholesterol; 46 g carbohydrates; 10 g added sugars; 5 g protein; 4 g fiber; 166 mg sodium; 234 mg potassium.

Recipe: Banana Split Bites

 

Summer is coming and these would be the perfect, most delicious recipe for you to take to a BBQ/Party!!!

Banana Split Bites, I can’t wait to make these!! Check out the recipe below and ENJOY!!!

Image

Ingredients:

1 medium banana, sliced into 16 coins

2 oz. (about 1/4 cup) fat-free strawberry Greek yogurt (like the kind by Chobani)

2 tsp. finely chopped peanuts
Directions:

Lay banana coins on a large plate or platter. Evenly top with yogurt, followed by peanuts.

Freeze until yogurt is firm, about 1 hour. Eat up!

Makes 1 serving

Entire recipe: 182 calories, 3g fat, 37mg sodium, 34.5g carbs, 3.5g fiber, 20.5g sugars, 7.5g protein

 

Whole Eggs – Good or Bad?

Jillian Michaels released an article about if you should or shouldn’t eat whole eggs – check it out below 🙂 ENJOY!!


The Truth: Not only are eggs a fantastic source of lean protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, but they contain some pretty important nutrients.

One large egg has roughly 186 milligrams of cholesterol — all of which is found in the egg’s yolk. Since dietary cholesterol was once thought to be the major cause of unhealthy blood cholesterol, egg yolks have been demonized and health nuts stick to eating strictly egg whites. Now, don’t get me wrong — egg whites are a great, healthy source of protein, but there is definitely room for WHOLE eggs in a healthy diet. As long as you haven’t been advised otherwise by your doctor, you can enjoy the many nutritional benefits of a whole egg. So, yes, you can have an egg and eat the yolk too! Here are a few reasons why.

The real threat to high cholesterol is saturated and trans fats, not dietary cholesterol. Years ago, when scientists learned that high blood cholesterol was associated with heart disease, foods high in cholesterol were thought to be the leading cause of unhealthy blood cholesterol. Now, 25 years later, scientists have come to the conclusion that cholesterol in food is not the true villain — saturated and trans fats have a much greater effect on blood cholesterol. Your body actually needs the cholesterol in meat and eggs to make testosterone, which helps to increase energy and helps to build more calorie-building muscle. In fact, one study at the University of Connecticut found that the fat in egg yolks actually helps to reduce LDL (“bad” cholesterol). So banish the old notion that an egg, specifically the yolk, is hazardous to your health. According to the American Heart Association, the recommended limit of dietary cholesterol is 300 milligrams for people with normal LDL (bad) cholesterol levels — and one egg contains 185 milligrams of dietary cholesterol. (If you have a history of high cholesterol or heart disease in your family, though, you may want to consult your doctor about how to limit your cholesterol intake.)

Whole eggs are full of beneficial vitamins and minerals. Whole eggs are a nearly perfect food, with almost every essential vitamin and mineral our bodies need to function. It is one of the few natural food sources of vitamin D and contains 7 grams of high-quality protein. Whole eggs are also full of omega-3 fatty acids and deliver many of the B vitamins and nutrients — B6, B12, riboflavin, folate, and choline — that, in fact, are believed to help prevent heart disease. L-arginine, an amino acid found in eggs, are critical to the body’s production of protein and the release of growth hormones. Another amino acid found in eggs, leucine, also helps the body produce growth hormones as well as regulate blood sugar levels. The yolk itself contains most of these vitamins and minerals, plus half of its protein. When you eat only the egg whites, you’re missing out on all of these nutritional benefits and are getting only 3.5 grams, or half, of the protein.

It’s all in the preparation. If you’re frying your eggs in saturated-fat-laden butter and serving them with saturated-fat-laden bacon — they will have a negative impact on your cholesterol levels. Instead, heat olive oil on low heat in a cast-iron skillet to cook your egg the healthiest way. When cooking omelets, frittatas, or any other dish that involves a larger quantity of eggs, I like to use a mix of whole eggs with egg whites. The reason is that whole eggs do have a decent amount of fat. So, if you’re cooking something with more than two eggs, I recommend subbing in egg whites for some of the whole eggs.

JILLIAN’S TIP OF THE DAY

The Bottom Line

Whole eggs are a power food packed with essential vitamins and minerals our bodies need — a majority of these vitamins and minerals are found in the egg yolk. Eating whole eggs in moderation is not bad for your health, but when making dishes with a large quantity of eggs, try to balance the count of whole eggs and egg whites.