Apple Nachos

Autumn is upon us and it’s my FAVOURITE time of the year.
I LOVE LOVE LOVE apple picking with my family.
I was browsing the internet to find some delicious snack recipes for my clients, and I found this one that I thought maybe you all would enjoy.

It’s a healthy spin on Nachos.  It’s perfect as well if you’re following a Paleo lifestyle.
Check it out below!
I’m definitely going to try it out.  I found this on the Paleo Grubs website.

nachos

Ingredients

• Apples
• Fresh lemon juice
• Almond butter
• Chocolate chips
• Unsweetened shredded coconut
• Sliced almonds

Instructions

1. Slice apples and toss with the lemon juice in a large bowl
2. Arrange the apples in a plate and drizzle with almond butter. You can use a pastry/piping bag or a ziploc bag to drizzle the almond butter.
3. Sprinkle with shredded coconut, chocolate chips and sliced almonds

Enjoy!! I know I will!

Danielle

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Apple Oatmeal Recipe

In this healthy oatmeal recipe, cook apples into your morning oatmeal and you’ll start the day right with whole grains and a serving of fruit.

Apple Oatmeal Recipe

Makes: 4 servings, about 1 1/4 cups each

Active Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 crisp apples, divided
  • 1 cup steel-cut oats
  • 4 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt

PREPARATION

  1. Shred 2 apples using the large holes of a box grater, leaving the core behind.
  2. Heat a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add oats and cook, stirring, until lightly toasted, about 2 minutes. Add water and the shredded apples; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to maintain a simmer and cook, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, chop the remaining 2 apples.
  4. After the oats have cooked for 10 minutes, stir in the chopped apples, 2 tablespoons brown sugar, cinnamon and salt; continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the apples are tender and the oatmeal is quite thick, 15 to 20 minutes more. Divide the oatmeal among 4 bowls. Top each portion with 2 tablespoons yogurt and 3/4 teaspoon brown sugar.

TIPS & NOTES

  • Shopping Tip: Choose unbruised, firm apples with smooth skin. Store for up to 4 months in the refrigerator.

NUTRITION

Per serving: 207 calories; 1 g fat (0 g sat, 1 g mono); 0 mg cholesterol; 46 g carbohydrates; 10 g added sugars; 5 g protein; 4 g fiber; 166 mg sodium; 234 mg potassium.

Should you eat before a workout?

MYTH: Never Eat Before a Workout

The Truth: You should always eat something before exercising so your body has enough fuel to power through your workout.

The rationale behind this widely accepted myth is that forgoing food before exercise will force your body to burn more fat during your workout. This is a big, fat lie: Starving yourself before exercising can actually be detrimental to your body. Let’s get to the bottom of this fitness myth once and for all.

You need sugar to exert energy. Your body needs a certain amount of sugar for fuel when training. When that blood sugar is not there, your body will convert your own muscle tissue into energy. A recent study published in the Strength and Conditioning Journal looked at cyclists who ate before they trained versus those who fasted before they trained. The amount of fat burn was the same for both groups, but those who had trained without eating first had 10 percent of their calorie burn come from protein — including their own muscle mass. You’re trying to buildmuscle, not eat away at it!

Your body needs energy to perform at a high intensity.You know I’m always saying that I want you to work out as hard as you can for as long as you can. How can you do that if you haven’t properly fueled your body? Think about it this way: Would you drive a car without gas? Use your iPhone without charging it? Nope and nope. If you haven’t eaten anything, your workout won’t be as intense as if you’d fueled up beforehand, not to mention that you’ll likely suffer from low blood sugar, which will make you dizzy and sluggish.

You don’t need to gorge yourself; a healthy snack will do the trick. I suggest you eat something 45 minutes to an hour before training — you’ll have more energy and endurance to work harder, burn more calories, and improve your muscle tone. Aim for something with carbohydrates and protein. Here are a few quick, healthy ideas: a whey shake, low-fat yogurt with berries, or a banana or apple slices with natural almond butter.

The Bottom Line:

You should always eat something before a workout. I’m not suggesting you pig out. A small, healthy snack consisting of carbohydrates and protein will properly fuel your body for a killer workout.

Stop mindless eating!

Let Go of the Trigger

Okay, go grab a notebook or use an online journal.  It’s time to start getting real about your emotional eating. Sure, it can be a vicious cycle if you allow it to progress, but I’m going to show you a quick little trick to help you understand your behaviors and break the destructive pattern. Let’s go.

Below are two questions. For a week, before you eat anything, whether it’s dinner or a small snack, I want you to answer these two questions in your journal. Sound easy? Well, you might be surprised. By doing this, you’ll be able to quickly tell if you’ve got real hunger or if your emotions are what’s causing you to reach for a bunch of junk you know you don’t need — or even really want.

Are you hungry?

Are you experiencing any physiological conditions that are signalling to you that you are hungry? Is your stomach growling? Do you feel weak or tired? Has it been longer than three or four hours since you last ate? If you concentrate on answering these questions, it will be very easy to determine whether you are genuinely, physically hungry or whether you are eating for a different reason. If you’ve determined that you are hungry, then it’s time to eat. If not, it’s time for the next question.

Are you depressed or anxious?

Did you just get into a fight? Are you anxious about a work-related deadline? Whatever it might be, write down what you’re feeling and why you think you’re feeling it. Getting in touch with your emotions here is critical. If you can’t, you’re going to have an incredibly difficult time reaching your weight loss goals. Dig deep, and get it in writing.

Always hungry? Maybe this hormone is out of whack!

 

I know there’s many people out there that no matter how much they eat, they are still hungry.  They can eat a half of a pizza, plus have dessert and they’re still hungry afterwards.  Does this sound like you?  Well it could be possible that it’s a condition called Leptin Resistance.

To understand leptin resistance, you first have to understand the role the hormone leptin plays in your metabolism. When you’ve eaten a meal, the fat cells throughout your body release leptin, which travels to the hypothalamus which is the part of your brain that helps regulate appetite.  While there, it switches off neuropeptide Y — a protein that tells your brain you’re hungry — and switches on appetite-suppressing signals. In other words, it gives your brain the message to stop being hungry and start burning calories.

You’d think, then, that low levels of leptin would be the cause of an unstoppable appetite, but that’s not necessarily the case. Some research indicates that many people who are overweight actually have very high levels of leptin. How could this be? Well, the more fat you have, the more leptin you produce. And when the body continually cranks out excess levels of leptin in response to overeating, the receptors for leptin in the hypothalamus can start to get worn out and no longer recognize it. People with leptin resistance have high circulating levels of leptin, but the receptors are “deaf” to it, so it can’t shut off appetite or stimulate your metabolism.

This vicious circle is similar to what happens when a person develops resistance to insulin, the hormone that allows your cells to use the glucose in your blood. (Insulin resistance can cause high blood glucose levels and eventually lead to diabetes.) In fact, the two conditions often go hand in hand, and research suggests that leptin resistance may be reversed in the same way that insulin resistance can be reversed — by exercising, eating right, and losing weight.

The Role of Fat

You probably don’t think of fat as an acetive part of your body, do you? Although researchers used to believe that fat cells were just big blobs of yuck waiting to get bigger or smaller, they now know that fat is an enormous endocrine gland, actively producing and reacting to hormones. The less fat you have, the less likely you are to overload your leptin receptors and deafen them to what leptin is trying to tell them — one more reason that fat-burning exercise is crucial for a healthy hormone balance!

Banish those Bad Habits!!!

I came across a great article, once again by Jillian Michaels.  She’s my mentor, so she’s going to be featured quite a bit on here.  Here’s her article summed up.

The key to breaking bad habits like overeating is to identify the things that are making you feel low or stressed. Here’s how to pinpoint your emotional triggers and establish healthy habits for life.

Unfortunately, we have all used food basically like a drug.  We use it to help ourselves cope with stress and emotions.  What we have to do is first IDENTIFY what exactly is making you feel the way you do..  These emotions can be feelings of pressure, sadness, anger or simply being anxious.  Now that you have done that, we can break down the cycle and start getting back in control of when, why and how you eat!

Identify Your Emotional Triggers

The best way to identify your own emotional triggers is through personal reflection. Facing your issues by bringing them out of your subconscious and into your conscious reality is the most empowering thing you can do. Take full advantage of a fitness diary. Write down not just what you eat every day but the emotional circumstances surrounding each meal and snack. From now on, every time you reach for a bite, I want you to stop and ask yourself the questions below so you can uncover the psychological and emo­tional issues that are triggering your unhealthy eating habits. Write down the answers so you can’t push them to the back of your mind when you’re done.

1. Are you hungry?

Are you experiencing physical signs of hunger? Is your stomach growling? Do you feel weak or tired? Has it been longer than four hours since you last ate? It’s not hard to figure out whether you’re genuinely hungry or whether you’re eating for a different reason like stress. If you’ve answered these ques­tions and determined that you are hungry, then eat. If not, it’s time for the next question.

2. Are you depressed or anxious?

Think of these following questions: Did you just get in a fight with someone? Anxious about a work-related or school deadline? Whatever it might be, make sure you write down in detail exactly what you feel and why you think you’re feeling it. If you don’t get in touch with your emotions and their cause, you’ll continue to stumble along in life with an absolute guarantee of failure.

3. Can you address whatever emo­tions you may have uncovered immediately and/or in an appropriate way rather than suppressing those emotions?

For example, if you had an argument with your mom, can you call her to talk it through? If you’re feeling anxious about a work- or school-related deadline, can you bust your butt a little more to make yourself feel more on top of it? If you can resolve the problem right then and there, do it! Facing these types of issues is tough — and it always seems easier to try and numb yourself with food. But once you start taking a closer look at your behavior and analyzing your feelings, it gets easier and easier. You might not always have the means to resolve an issue or a situation at the exact mo­ment that it’s triggering you to behave self-destructively, but it’s all about doing what you can, learning from your mistakes, and being self-aware.

4. How can you turn this problem into an opportunity?

Maybe you’ve recently ended a relationship with a long-term spouse or significant other. Or say you’ve just been fired from a job. Instead of seeing these kinds of scenarios as permanent blows to your self-esteem, view them in a different light. Sure, you’re probably in a lot of pain right now, but maybe the relationship had been over for a while and there’s someone better out there for you. If you’re dealing with unemployment, tell yourself that losing your job doesn’t change the fact that you’re a kick-ass, smart, capable person who’ll have plenty of future offers. Stay positive. Accept that sometimes you can’t see the forest for the trees, and you’ll be able to stay strong through the low moments and find meaning in the pain.

Establish Healthy Patterns

Now you have the tools for identifying, acknowledging, and bringing to the surface the emotions that have sabotaged you in the past. Next, find some activities that comfort and interest you so you’ll have the power to combat your emotions without resorting to food. Think about what (apart from eating!) soothes you. What makes you feel beautiful or sexy and desirable? If you steer yourself toward feelings of self-worth, you’ll pick activities and behaviors that inherently contradict self-loathing and self-sabotage. Take a bubble bath and listen to tunes you love. Go for a longer-than-usual walk with your pup. Go out dancing with friends. Get a massage or a mani-pedi. Learn to reward and nurture yourself with things that make you feel happy to be alive, and you will break the cycle of self-destruction caused by emotional overeating!