Iced Tea? Yes Please!

Good afternoon!! The weekend is upon us!!

We all enjoy summer BBQ’s and get togethers… well if you’re thinking of sitting back and relaxing this weekend, why not whip this drink up – it’s quite delicious!!

It’s a drink that Dr. Oz recommends thanks to the many health benefits of green tea.  We all know the benefits, right?  Well, green tea purifies your body and maintains vitality – and it’s GREAT for your metabolism.  Green tea accelerates your metabolism by 12%, it regulates your blood sugar levels and reduces the risk of a heart attack and various forms of cancer. It also strengthens your immunity and improves your mood.

Find the recipe below – enjoy! 

Ingredients:

  • 1 litre water
  • 5 green tea bags
  • 1 orange
  • A handful of fresh mint

In boiling water add 5 bags of green tea. Allow to stand for 5 minutes and leave the tea to cool. Orange cut into wedges. Put the tea in a large jar and add the orange slices and mint. Close the jar and leave overnight. The next day drink the tea. Dr. Oz recommends one cup of this drink in the mornings on empty stomach, before meals, and rest to drink at night before going to bed.

Have a wonderful weekend!!

Danielle

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Do Quick Fixes really work?

Quick-fix diet methods, like colonics, cleanses and fasting do more harm than good to your body — and can actually hurt your weight-loss efforts.

Whenever you see any type of get-skinny-fast diet or program, be wary  — there is NO quick road to weight loss!

No shortcuts, no secret pills, no magic potions — got it? Want to lose weight and keep it off? The only way to is to eat healthy foods, and exercise regularly.  TRUST ME!! I didn’t lose that 100lbs by fasting, or doing cleanses.  I got my ass to the gym and I ate real food.  Yes I know I worked within a weight loss company, but I did not use any of the pills to assist with my initial weight loss.  I was dedicated and motivated to lose that weight.

I know many of you already know quick fixes don’t work, but that doesn’t stop individuals from wondering all the time whether certain trendy cleanses and colonics really work. While cleanses or colonics may be necessary for medical reasons (testing foods to find an allergy, surgical procedure, etc.), there is absolutely no reason you should treat these methods as beneficial to weight-loss. Here’s why:

No medical research shows that there are any health benefits or true weight loss from colonics. The only weight loss that colonics promote is from the removal of fluid and waste from your bowels. Claims that colonics help to detoxify your body and restore your colon’s health are complete crap. No pun intended. Here’s the thing: Your digestive system and bowels naturally eliminate waste material and bacteria — you don’t need a colonic to do this! Not only do colonics fail to help your weight-loss efforts, but they can have negative side effects. Colonics have been shown to create electrolyte imbalances, which can result in nausea, vomiting, bloating and muscle cramps. Unless your doctor schedules you for a colonic for medical reasons, I would avoid getting one — and save the $55 to $95 per treatment cost too.

“Fasting cleanses” do more harm to your body than good. The term cleanse makes me laugh, because the only thing that detoxes your body is clean eating, nutrients that support your liver and kidneys and water. Stop eating processed crap and start eating whole, real foods. Thinking that drinking a concoction of lemon, syrup and cayenne pepper or drinking salt water and laxative tea, like the Master Cleanse, will “detoxify” your body and create permanent weight loss is completely inaccurate. Sure, doing cleanses can make you lose weight quick but in a month they put that weight back on. You starve your body for a period of time, and then when you start eating again, you put all that weight back on — and then some. You’re screwing with your metabolism to boot and that’s dangerous.  So STOP IT.

Fasting will destroy your metabolism. From a biochemical perspective, fasting throws your body into starvation mode. When you don’t provide your body with nutrients, it sends signals that you are now in starvation mode. Which means your body releases hormones that will slow down your metabolism, cannibalize your muscles, and store fat. The physiological facts: Since fat is needed for survival to insulate our bodies, we store it, but muscle is expendable. When you restrict nutrients to your body, your body will start to eat its own muscle tissue, and (double whammy) become more proficient at storing fat. The main point: Don’t fast, unless it’s for a religious purpose that you feel strongly about, and even then, be careful to only do it only for a short period of time.

There are no quick fixes when it comes to weight loss. The key to “cleansing” your body is drinking water and eating whole, real foods. Colonics, fasting cleanses, and fasting methods are just sending your body and your metabolism into starvation mode — which can create long-term negative side effects that aren’t worth the few pounds you initially lost.

10 Questions You’ve Always Had about Water

You’ve heard it over and over; water is key to a variety of health benefits, including beautiful skin, proper muscle and joint function, and improved mood.  How many of the statements you’ve heard are actually true though? Here are 10 common questions surrounding water, and whether they’re popular answers are fact or fiction. See how many you thought you knew!

1- Does everyone need 8 cups of water a day?

Drinking 8 glasses a day is not a rule set in stone. The truth is that fluid needs vary from person to person. Factors like weight, exercise levels, climate, and the quantity of water-rich foods you eat (usually food provides about 20% of your hydration needs) all play a role. Divide your body weight in pounds by two for a general estimate of the amount of ounces you should drink per day. For cups, divide that number by 8. 

2- Is plain water the perfect source of hydration?

While plain water is a smart choice for hydration, it is not the only option you have. Most fluids like flavoured water, tea, green tea, coffee, fruit and vegetable juices, sports drinks and hydrating foods like cucumbers and melons count too! Note that not all fluids hydrate. Alcohol, for example, dehydrates you (dehydration is one of the symptoms of a hangover) and is calorie-dense and usually nutrient-empty, as are most pops and sugary beverages.

While water is calorie-free and and has no additives, depending on your needs the other options provide benefits as well. Sports drinks, for example, are helpful to athletes exercising for prolonged periods of time. Tea and coffee may provide the caffeine jolt you need to curb a headache. Flavoured water is a simple way to add antioxidants from fruit to otherwise plain water. Choose the best option for you.

3- Will drinking water help me lose weight?

This statement is true, but probably not for the reasons you think. Water itself does not cause weight loss, but replacing calorie-rich fluids like pop and juices with water decreases calorie intake, which does cause weight loss. Sipping on water instead of snacking helps save calories as well.

4- Should I drink before or after a meal?

As a child, I was constantly told not to drink with my meals because then I wouldn’t be hungry. Some also believe that water dissolves the stomach’s digestive juices, resulting in poorly digested food. In reality, water actually aids in digestion, and while it is true that it fills you up, this is beneficial for those of us trying to eat less. Moderation is key, of course. Instead of guzzling down glass after glass throughout a meal, take small sips to slow down your eating pace, help avoid overeating, break down food, and aid in digestion. Water consumption is particularly important when consuming a fiber-rich meal too, as it will help avoid constipation!

5- Will water make me gain weight?

On the opposite side of the spectrum, most of us experience weight gain with increased water intake. Luckily, weight fluctuations due to water (and food!) are natural and the water weight (not fat!) gained will eventually be lost. Water also reduces bloating, which can reflect a drop on the scale too.  Avoid scale induced frustration by weighing yourself on the same scale at the same time each week.

6- Does lemon water help burn more calories?

Speeding up your metabolism is one way to burn more calories, but a glass of water with squeezed lemon won’t do the trick. While the vitamin C content may benefit your immune system, your metabolism won’t be directly affected as it is by thermogenic foods. Enjoy lemon water as a flavorful alternative to plain water, but don’t count on it  as a primary way to shed pounds!

7- Can I drink too much water?

Believe it or not, you can, although this occurrence is very rare. It is known as water intoxication and characterized by excess fluid in the body’s cells. The excess causes sodium to be diluted and your homeostatic concentration gradient to be thrown off. The average person should not worry about water intoxication as long as they don’t consume large volumes all at once. At risk are infants who drink too much for their kidneys to process, athletes who drink too much water after sweating out electrolytes, and people with health conditions like high blood pressure, edema, and kidney problems.

8- Is bottled water the safest to drink

A bottled water craze has taken storm in developing and first-world countries alike due to concern for contaminants. The concern is justified when you’re using the water for everything from washing your hands to cooking a meal. The safety of tap water does depend on where you live though. Canadian drinking water is among the safest in the world, and any contaminants (like lead) are quickly detected through close monitoring of supplies. If you’re still concerned, a simple water filter may help (and save you money!).

9- Will I know when I’m dehydrated?

Yes. Thirst is an early sign of possible dehydration, but it does not mean that you are already dehydrated. You feel thirst (and can sometimes mistake it for hunger) when your water balance is anywhere from 1 to 5 percent off homeostasis levels. Consciously sipping on fluids throughout the day should be enough to avoid this and other progressive signs of dehydration like feeling cranky, tired, or having a headache. This is especially important for older adults, as their sense of thirst may be dulled.

10- Does water cleanse and hydrate my body from the inside?

Vibrant skin and inner cleansing are two perceived benefits surrounding water intake that are not completely unfounded. Sufficient water does aid the kidneys in their function of cleansing toxins and expelling them through urine. The more often you drink, the more often toxins will be expelled. This cleansing effect may also contribute to youthful skin, but outside factors like climate, quantity of oil glands, and moisturizing play a bigger role.