Should you weigh yourself everyday ?

MYTH: Weighing Yourself Daily Will Help You Stay on Track

The Truth: I recommend that people weigh themselves once a week, at the same time every week. Weighing yourself every day can have a negative impact on you.

 For so many of us the scale is a source of stress and self-loathing, but it really shouldn’t be. Don’t think of  the scale as anything other than a compass — something we use when losing weight to keep us going in the right direction. It tells us what’s going on with our bodies so we can effectively modify our regimen to ensure continued weight loss. It’s just a tool — no more and no less. So how frequently should you consult it? Here’s my opinion on the topic:

Your weight varies throughout the day. Not only does your weight change every day, it also changes at different times through a single day, so there is no point to weighing yourself every day — and definitely not multiple times a day.This is because of body fluid fluctuations — you might be retaining water from too much sodium consumption, or you may not have gone to the bathroom yet (gross, but true). All of these things affect your weight. The issue with checking the scale DAILY, is that minor fluctuations can freak people out — or discourage them from their weight-loss efforts. Instead, take photos, body measurements, and judge yourself by your fitness endurance and how your clothes are fitting you.

To use the scale effectively, you should weigh yourself once a week. I want you to weigh yourself once a week at the same time, on the same day of the week, wearing similar clothing, and most importantly, ON THE SAME SCALE.  Weighing yourself just once a week will give you a more accurate read — you’ll allow time for the scale to actually show weight loss. The number on the scale will help you figure out if you need to make adjustments to what you’re eating or how you’re exercising. Keep in mind that half a pound to two pounds is a realistic weight loss so don’t expect drastic results.

NEVER weighing yourself is a bad idea. Are you one of those people who doesn’t weigh themselves all year, and then finally steps on the scale at their annual physical? This isn’t the right way to go either! Never weighing yourself and, instead, determining how “healthy” you are by how you feel, isn’t the best method. To know how healthy you are is to know that number on the scale. If you’re in maintenance mode (and not trying to lose weight), I’d still suggest you weigh yourself once a week, or at least twice a week. Your weight is a total picture of your overall health, and it’s good to keep tabs on yourself 

The Bottom Line

Confront the scale and find the right day for your weekly weigh in’s and stick with it so it turns into a habit
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Switch it up!

Do More Than One Type of Cardio!

Do you do your cardio on the treadmill or the elliptical machine? How about trying a little of both? Does the thought scare you a bit? Most people like to stick to one machine for cardio, but I want you to change your mind-set. To reach your fitness goals, you have to let go of that all-or-nothing mentality. And let’s face it — eventually, you’ll need more than one cardio option. One day, the weather may not be cooperative for your usual outdoor jog, or all the ellipticals will be in use, or the pool will be closed, or your bike will be in the repair shop. Be flexible.

To get you thinking of the big picture, let’s take a look at all the options available in the always-popular walk-jog-run trio.

You can perform any of these activities on a treadmill or outdoors. The key is to mix it up and keep it challenging. To burn maximum calories, you have a few options: you can walk on an incline, walk fast, jog, or run, depending on what you’re ready for at your current fitness level.

Try performing intervals by running or jogging in quarter-mile bursts. You can also work different muscles in your legs by running backward every once in a while — obviously you can’t do this everywhere. You might also try sports drills like running sideways, or karaokes, in which you run sideways by crossing your right foot first in front of your left foot and then behind your left foot; you then switch directions, crossing the left foot in front and then behind the right foot.

Don’t Forget About Stairs

Stair-climbers and step-mills are a great cardio option. The key to getting the most out of this exercise is to take full steps. Make sure you let your bottom leg fully extend without touching the ground before stepping back up. Don’t lean on the machine or hold on to anything. If you need to set the speed lower in order to go hands-free, do it — you’re better off moving your upper body as you step. You can also perform this exercise sideways, and you can alternate your right leg over your left leg, and vice versa

Love YOU!

Think you’ll never look like actress Jennifer Aniston? You won’t. Believe me — Jennifer Aniston (or any other celebrity you can name) doesn’t even look like the glammed up version of themselves in real life! Face it: We’re bombarded with images of ideal beauty everywhere — on television, in movies, in magazines, you name it. When we compare ourselves with these unattainable, airbrushed images of perfection, we’re always going to come up short. No wonder we pick ourselves apart and get depressed!
The only way out of this trap of negativity is to let go of unrealistic notions of what you should look like. While exercise and eating right are key components to healthy living, accepting and loving your body — working with it rather than against it — are important, too.
Take a good, hard look at where your negative feelings about yourself are coming from. Determine what the source is — whether it’s the media, judgment from family or friends, or maybe a bad relationship; you have to identify it first before you can begin to let it go. Looking for perfect? Forget perfect — it’s boring! Embrace your perceived imperfections (c’mon, they make you unique) and love who you are. It’s the only way to move forward.
Go on a Media Diet 
Movies, TV shows, magazines, and other forms of mass media can be entertaining and uplifting, but they also wreak havoc on some people’s self-esteem. Do you let these ideal images bug you?  Write down how you feel after reading a beauty magazine or watching a movie. If you feel terrible after watching an episode of Modern Family, then change the channel!
When you stop judging yourself against unrealistic standards, you’ll feel much better.
Bottom line: Your behaviors are your choice. Do what you can to stay healthy and you’ll raise the bar on your quality of life.

Read the Fine Print on the Labels

Ever been told to “read the fine print” before signing a contract? It’s a warning to check for loop holes and problematic terms before committing to something, right?

Well, it’s a crummy fact of life but many things don’t come as advertised. Packaged foods are no exception. Many items that are billed as healthy on the front label, reveal another story when you check out the ingredients on the back.

Don’t be fooled by advertising. Avoid bad choices and be on the alert for these common food label traps:

  • Fat Free: Fat-free foods can be higher in carbs than their regular counterparts and may have almost as many calories. Fat-free cookies are a perfect example. Fat-free is not necessarily a better choice. Read your labels carefully.
  • Serving Size: If it seems too good to be true, then it probably is. You cannot use half a bottle of butter spray and still think you’re getting zero calories and zero grams of fat! It’s true that per serving it’s just that, but spray your entire bowl of popcorn and you’ve got way more calories and fat than you intended.
  • Trans fats: While you’re being smart looking at the packaging that says “trans fat-free,” check the ingredient list to see if it contains partially hydrogenated oil. You may think your meal is in the clear because of the outside packaging, and while it’s technically true if you only eat one serving, you’d be eating the nasty trans fat too if you’re going for more than one serving — something you’re supposed to avoid at all costs!

Be cautious and keep yourself informed!  You will spend a lot of time reading labels at first. It will get easier though — trust me. Once you’re familiar with a particular product’s label you’ll know if it’s a good choice in the future. Then you’ll be down to reading the labels on new products. Having said that, don’t assume that the products you buy every week will always be a good choice. Companies do change their product formulas, serving sizes, etc. So if a favourite product suddenly has a new look, read the back carefully.

Writing it down.

Write It to Lose It!

Don’t panic over what I’m about to tell you: You have some writing homework. Now, I’m not sending you back to fifth grade with this one, but I do want you to get comfortable putting your thoughts and emotions on paper. You may be skeptical about this, but journaling on a regular basis will play a key role in helping you meet your weight-loss goals. 

Let me explain. Your journal is a place for you to write everything down, to see it in front of you, and to work through your problems and toward your goals. Without a journal, it’s too easy to avoid your hang-ups and stay in neutral.

Writing about your goals will also help you think them through: Do you want to be healthy, confident, physically and mentally strong? Are there clothes you want to wear that you can’t now? Do you want to see and feel yourself in your ultimate body, living a new life, playing with your kids, going on a date, getting compliments from friends or coworkers? Whatever your ultimate goals, physical and emotional, write them down in as much detail as you can, and refer back to them often. They will help you stay motivated on your journey.

If you have easy access to your computer every day, commit for one week to recording an entry a day in an online diary. It’s easy!  You can keep track of your workouts, you can use it to organize your thoughts. And it’s a great place to record what’s going on with you where food is concerned, too!

For those times that your aren’t in front of you computer, choose anything from a simple lined notebook or a leather-bound blank diary. Besides writing down how you feel, you can include photos of yourself to chart your progress, pictures of clothes you’d like to wear, new recipes you’d like to try, and more. The sky’s the limit! The most important thing is to find a journal that suits you.
I personally enjoy using paper.  I find typing everything doesn’t keep me committed.  I enjoy having documentation right there in front of me in a notebook.  My one office wall is going to be dedicated to my goals.  I’m utilizing the wall in my office as a motivational wall.  This way, when i’m writing blogs such as this, there are motivating captions all around me.  Pictures, motivational quotes, my goals, and articles that interest me will be going up on the wall.
I’m excited for the next step in my journey.  I’m currently in process of writing a book.  Okay, I’m unsure it’ll ever actually become a BOOK for others to read, but I’ve gone through a lot; physically and emotionally.  Why not share my experiences with others who may benefit from them to help cope with what they’re going through.

 

Until next time.

 

I just want to thank Jillian Michaels.  Her articles inspire me to write these blogs 🙂

How to get started!

How do you get started? It looks like you already have. The simple fact is that you can change your life by changing your mind. Nothing is impossible for the willing mind! We all have the power to gain control of our lives, reach our goals, and live our dreams. The challenge is locating, nurturing, and believing in your ability to do so.

You’ve worked out before, and you have some experience with eating right. But now you’re ready to take things up a notch and get the body you’ve always wanted. Here’s what you should do:

1. Clean the crap out of your cupboards.So you think you know how to eat healthfully? Let’s see…how many boxes of crackers and bags of chips do you have lying around? How often do you cook white rice or refined pasta? Processed foods contain more endocrine disruptors (Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that may interfere with the body’s endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, and immune effects in humans) than you can shake a stick at, and youwant them out of your life.

2. Replace it with whole foods. Fresh, whole foods like vegetables, fruits, lean meats, low-fat dairy products, and whole grains should be the focus of your diet.

3. Get on board with strength training. Let me guess: Whenever you’ve tried to lose weight in the past, you’ve done cardio…and more cardio, and more cardio. Cardio is great (in fact, I encourage it as “extra credit” toward weight loss), but it doesn’t help you maintain metabolism-boosting muscle and it doesn’t burn as many calories as circuit-training.

4. Know your target heart rate. To get the maximum calorie burn in the shortest possible time, I recommend exercising at a high intensity — 85 percent of your maximum heart rate.  To find out your target heart rate just visit this site:

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/healthtool-target-heart-rate-calculator

5. Keep track of what you eat. The formula for weight loss is simple: You need to burn more calories than you eat. That means you need to be aware of how many calories you put into your body so you can stay on track. I personally keep a food diary.  I record everything that goes in my mouth.  Pretty much if you eat it, record it.  I like the old fashion way, just writing it in a food journal, but I know many people who use Apps on their smart phones.  Apps such as “My Fitness Pal” and “Lose It”  Both these apps have thousands of foods that have already been added with their nutrition information.

6. Evaluate your habits. If you’ve tried to lose weight before but weren’t successful, ask yourself what was standing in your way. Are you an emotional eater? Do you take an all-or-nothing approach that sets you up for failure?  What I’ve done in the past is keep record of when you eat when NOT hungry.  I mean, if you get stressed out and find that you’re turning to food, write it down.  Write down the date/time and how you’re currently feeling.  This will help you realize how you’re feeling when you turn to food.  It’ll help evaluate if you’re actually hungry or if you’re hunger is triggered by something else.

The first thing you need to understand is how your emotions and your behaviors affect your weight. You need to commit all your mental resources toward change. Learn how to take control of negative self-image and poor self-esteem through journaling, positive affirmations, visualization, and behavior-modification techniques. It’s also important to build a support system and communicate with your family and friends so they know what you need and how best to support you. Identify temptations and “trigger foods” (foods that you have a hard time controlling) in your life so you can modify your daily routine and behavior. Next, you must learn how and what to eat. Learn how to make healthier choices and find out what the right types of foods are for your individual metabolism. Then educate yourself about calories. How many is your body burning daily? How many are in the foods you are eating? How many do you burn when you exercise? Starting to get the picture? Weight loss is simple math. A pound is 3,500 calories — so to lose a pound you will need to burn 3,500 calories more than you take in. It’s “calories in” versus “calories out.”

This is where the exercise comes in. Exercise is the best way to get those “calories out” and burn fat. Get yourself acquainted with exercise. Find out the most effective ways to work out in order to burn the most calories. It’s also important to learn where your heart rate should be when doing resistance training and cardio, the proper form and purpose for each exercise you perform, and how to modify and progress your fitness routine to prevent plateau.